Archives for February 7th, 2000

PERFORMANCE REVIEW TEAM STUMBLE ACROSS BIG ISSUE

Headlines, PublicNet: 7 February, 2000

The Civil Service salary structure is inflexible and does not reward performance. This is perhaps the most important finding to emerge from the work of the Public Service Productivity Panel team, whose remit was to recommend improvements to incentive reward schemes.The team found that skills in the four agencies they looked at can be gained in 2 to 3 years, but it can take 25 years to progress to the top of the salary scale. This creates frustration and has a negative impact on performance.

Read more on PERFORMANCE REVIEW TEAM STUMBLE ACROSS BIG ISSUE…



CREATING A PERFORMANCE CULTURE IN THE CIVIL SERVICE

Headlines, PublicNet: 7 February, 2000

Publication of a report on performance incentive schemes is the first step in seeking to create a performance culture in the Civil Service. The study team was led by John Makinson, Group Finance Director of Pearson plc and sponsored by the Public Services Productivity Panel. Their remit was to look at incentive schemes operating in Benefits Agency, Customs and Excise, Employment Service and Inland Revenue. Collectively the agencies employ over 200,000 people, the majority of whom earn less than 20,000 pounds a year.The team found that there was no performance culture and that current incentive schemes are ineffective and discredited. Schemes rely currently on subjective assessments, because there is virtually no hard information about the performance of individuals.

Read more on CREATING A PERFORMANCE CULTURE IN THE CIVIL SERVICE…

REPRESENTING THE PEOPLE? TESTING THE ATTITUDES ABOUT LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Abstracts, PublicNet: 7 February, 2000

REFORMRao N

Public Administration, (UK), 1999 Vol 77 No 2

Start page: 257. No of pages: 15

Looks at the various options that have been proposed for reforming local government in the UK to improve the representation of local people at this level of government. Assesses the attitudes of local government councillors to the different proposals (elected mayors or a streamlined system in which responsibility is given to a small ‘cabinet’ of councillors). Finds a large majority of councilors in favour of retaining the existing committee system, setting out their views on its value and effectiveness. Focuses on the time commitments that arise for councillors because of the committee system, looking at how councillors view the split between different aspects of their council work. Analyses how councillors’ views change according to their position in the Council leadership, age, education and political party. Considers if there is a real need to change the role of councillors within local government, suggesting that the old system is capable of adaption, which could lead to a stronger system of representational democracy than the more radical solutions that have been proposed.

Read more on REPRESENTING THE PEOPLE? TESTING THE ATTITUDES ABOUT LOCAL GOVERNMENT…

© PublicNet is a KnowShare production | Technology by Jag Singh + Hilton & Hilton Ltd | Admin Log in