Archives for November 13th, 2000

INTERNET VOTING MOVES NEARER

Headlines, PublicNet: 13 November, 2000

New systems for processing ballot papers, such as those used in the election of London’s mayor, may be heading for redundancy. The next development is Internet voting using a personal computer, digital TV or mobile phone. The announcement that BT and election.com plan to work together to develop a range of electronic balloting and election services for the UK’s public and private sectors brings the prospect closer. The aim is to provide facilities that can be used for national elections down to ballots for local school governors. Digital signature will be used to authenticate voters and the project will benefit from work going on elsewhere to develop secure authentication arrangements.The advantages of Internet voting are that it may encourage more people to take part in an election process and it is considerably cheaper.

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USING THE SCALPEL ON DOCTORS’ PAPERWORK

Headlines, PublicNet: 13 November, 2000

A Cabinet Office team is looking for ways to cut the time GPs spend on paperwork so that they can spend more time improving the service. The team, which had a modest success earlier in the year with cutting forms for the police, has interviewed general practitioners and other stakeholders.An advisory panel has been set up to provide professional expertise to enable the team to prioritise the areas to be tackled and to give advice from the patient’s perspective. The aim is to simplify or remove some of the 63 forms which GPs have to complete and to find alternative ways of dealing with the information. The advisory panel is made up from GPs, the Patients Association, Department of Health, a Primary Care Group the Small Practices Association and the NHS Alliance.

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RECEPTIVITY TO ASSESSMENT BASED FEEDBACK

Abstracts, PublicNet: 13 November, 2000

Ryan A M, Brutus S, Greguras G J, Hakel M D
Journal of Management Development, (UK), 2000 Vol 19 No 4
Start page: 252 . No of pages: 25

Examines the managers’ reactions to management development feedback, to understand the factors that affect their acceptance of it. Briefly analyses the differences between management development and job performance feedback, before reporting research with participants and those giving feedback in a popular US management development programme. Sets out the factors that might be expected to influence the participants’ receptivity to feedback – self-awareness, age, demographic similarity between the feedback giver and receiver, previous acquaintance with the feedback giver, and self-esteem. Assesses the influence of these factors, using a survey of 225 participants (gaining a response from 90%) and analysis of tapes of the feedback (55% agreeing to this). Also asks those giving the feedback for their assessment of receptivity. Finds some support for the view that all the factors listed would influence receptivity. However, notes that participants reported that they were more receptive if the person giving the feedback was of similar race and had been met before. Also reports that those giving the feedback saw those participants who were younger, of opposite gender, and more self-aware, as being more receptive. Considers the practical and research implications of this.

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