Archives for May 1st, 2001

CASH INJECTION FOR TEACHERS STARTS TO GET RESULTS

Headlines, PublicNet: 1 May, 2001

Teacher recruitment difficulties and the reluctance of experienced teachers to apply for headships are two issues responding to a cash injection strategy. The number of graduates applying to train as teachers has increased by 24 per cent and the Teaching Information Line is receiving over 1,000 calls each day. The starting salaries for new teachers are 17,001 pounds outside London rising to 20,001 pounds in inner London. Research has revealed that potential recruits to teaching underestimate the starting salary by more than 20 per cent. Teaching has been made a more attractive profession by introducing training bursaries and golden hellos as well as by paying higher starting salaries. For more experienced teachers there are also management allowances and performance related promotion up to a maximum salary of 31,000 pounds for those who want to stay in the classroom.Figures just published show that over the last year more deputy head teachers applied for head teacher training and that the number of vacancies in head teacher posts is declining. The head teacher role is becoming more attractive as a result of performance related pay. More than half of head teachers will have received annual increases of around 1,000 pounds with those at the top of the leadership scale receiving 1,700 pounds. Most deputies will have received increases of about 500 pounds, with some receiving over 1,000 pounds

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NARROWING THE GAP BETWEEN POOR NEIGHBOURHOODS AND THE REST

Headlines, PublicNet: 1 May, 2001

A further 22 of the poorest neighbourhoods in the UK have been allocated funds from the New Deal for Communities budget for re-generation. Each partnership was given 200,000 pounds in November 1999 to develop plans to tackle problems such as crime, poor health, unemployment and educational underachievement. Local people and organizations worked together to identify neighbourhoods of between 1,000-4,000 households and decide what’s wrong and what needs to change. They also decided who should be in charge of making change happen.The partnerships have been allocated an average of 50m pounds over ten years to put their plans into action. They will draw on the experience of the 17 pathfinder projects launched in 1999, which have shown that by engaging all stakeholders in the area including residents, local businesses, voluntary organisations and service providers, results can be delivered. Examples of achievement include a community-driven package of crime-fighting measures which led to a 30% drop in crime in the area and setting up an employment agency in another area which found jobs for 28 people in the first few months of operation.

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