Archives for July 5th, 2001

SPOTLIGHT ON VOLUNTARY SECTOR POINTS TO GREATER INVOLVEMENT IN PUBLIC SERVICES

Headlines, PublicNet: 5 July, 2001

The Prime Minister Tony Blair has called for a review of the voluntary sector. The Performance and Innovation Unit in the Cabinet Office in carrying out the review will consider how the regulatory and legal framework of the voluntary sector could better enable existing organizations to thrive and grow; encourage the development of new types of organizations where needed and ensure public confidence. The report is due to be published in the winter.Announcing the review Tony Blair restated the Government’s commitment to working in partnership with charities and the voluntary sector to strengthen their contribution to the health and dynamism of the society and the economy. This can be interpreted as an indication that the Government plans greater involvement of the voluntary sector in the delivery of public services.

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PROMOTING THE WORK CULTURE

Headlines, PublicNet: 5 July, 2001

Alastair Darling Secretary of State for Work and Pensions has set out the Government’s strategy for restoring a work culture, which he claimed had been undermined in some areas since the 1980s. Where there is seen to be little prospect of work, people accept receipt of benefit as a way of life. He claimed that getting people into paid employment was one way to reduce a whole range of social ills, including crime and disorder.The strategy will support people in the over 50s group, lone parents and disabled people to help them find work. It is estimated that up to 70% of 2.3 million people claiming incapacity benefit could return to work. A proposal to require people on disability benefit to undergo periodic health checks has brought a storm of protest.

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THE ECONOMICS OF CRIME

Abstracts, PublicNet: 5 July, 2001

By Ricardo Lagos.The author examines the usefulness of economics in the fight against crime. Many industrial countries have responded to steadily rising crime by pouring money into extra policing in order to catch more criminals and then sent more of those they catch to jail and for longer periods. But this approach is now being questioned. Economists have become increasingly convinced that economic incentives may be a crucial determinant of criminal involvement, at least in property crime.

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