Archives for November 5th, 2001

THE CHANGING WORLD OF TOP OFFICIALS: MANDARINS OR VALETS?

Book News, PublicNet: 5 November, 2001

By R.A.W. Rhodes and Patrick WellerThe authors look at the roles and workings of the heads of government departments in six nations: departmental secretaries in Australia, departments chefs in Denmark, directeurs d’administration in France, secretaris-generaal in The Netherlands, chief executives in New Zealand, and permanent secretaries in the UK. They also explore their “infinite variety” by showing how inherited government traditions shape the response to reform.

Read more on THE CHANGING WORLD OF TOP OFFICIALS: MANDARINS OR VALETS?…



POLICY MAKERS MODERNISE THEIR CRAFT

Headlines, PublicNet: 5 November, 2001

Policy makers in central departments are changing their ways of working and adapting to a world which is becoming increasingly complex, uncertain and unpredictable. The policy process has been changed to bring in a wider range of views and facts and to respond to the joined up approach of the modernizing agenda.The changes are set out in a comprehensive survey of policy making across government which highlights the work civil servants have done to change their ways of working to help the Government develop more effective policies. The report is published by the Cabinet Office’s Centre for Management and Policy Studies. It features 40 examples of new and innovative approaches to ‘what works’ in government, from conflict management to disability benefits, from credit card fraud to home buying and selling.

Read more on POLICY MAKERS MODERNISE THEIR CRAFT…

POLICE REFORM GOES FOR A FOCUS ON CRIME

Headlines, PublicNet: 5 November, 2001

The main thrust of police reform will be to allow officers to concentrate on their core functions of reducing crime and catching criminals. Measures are now being launched that will allow police officers to make the best use of their professional training, skills, and wide-ranging powers. The latest measure should be seen against the background of extending the police family by appointing street wardens and auxiliaries to deal with anti-social behaviour and extending the powers of the British Transport police to assist with crowd control.The proposals include transferring some responsibilities to other agencies and greater use of support staff. Tasks which could be transferred include missing persons, lost property and lost pets. A trend towards ‘civilianisation’ has already started, with the Metropolitan Police in the lead. Support staff will now be used for custody duties and for preparing the paperwork needed to bring about a prosecution. UNISON, the trade union which represents police support staff believes that there is still some way to go to break down the old barriers and prejudices over the status of support staff. It argues that its members work with the day to day reality and that old demarcation lines are being increasingly blurred, as they take on more traditional police work.

Read more on POLICE REFORM GOES FOR A FOCUS ON CRIME…

© PublicNet is a KnowShare production | Technology by Jag Singh + Hilton & Hilton Ltd | Admin Log in