Archives for November 7th, 2001

CHALLENGE TO E-GOVERNMENT FOCUS

Headlines, PublicNet: 7 November, 2001

The e-Government target to put all services on line by 2005 may not be the best way to raise standards and give the taxpayer a better deal. With Internet access growth at a standstill and the e-Envoy warning that it would be a waste of public money putting online services that would not be used, the wisdom of focusing on government to citizen services is being challenged.One challenger is Ian Busby, CEO of E-Government Solutions (eGS), who believes that the focus should be broadened with new targets for joining up services to support those most in need. Using e-technology to bridge between agencies in local and central government would provide better and
more responsive services. For example, an online system giving social services, hospitals and GPs help in providing a seamless service to the elderly would deliver huge benefits.

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PUBLIC SERVICE LEADERS TAKE THE BUS TO THE SHARP END

Headlines, PublicNet: 7 November, 2001

Senior public service leaders spent a day on a bus to get a first hand grasp of the London BusPlus partnership. They investigated the aims, challenges and solutions being addressed by the partnership. The investigation was an important part of the Leaders in Partnership programme organized by the Centre for Management and Policy Studies.The CMPS programme is designed to bring together public sector leaders from the civil service, local government, the NHS, the police, education and the voluntary sectors. The passengers on this bus included a Deputy Chief Constable, the Director for Qualifications and Young People of the Department for Education and Skills and a Chief Executive and a Director of Environmental Services from local government.

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TO WHOM MUCH IS GIVEN

Abstracts, PublicNet: 7 November, 2001

This report is a response by the Audit Commission to the challenges facing elected members of councils by the separation of councilor roles into executive and scrutiny. New models which the changes will bring could stimulate local government and bring greater connection with local people,
but there are key questions to be answered including how do members get the training and resources they need. The report examines concerns about the effect of the changes. The new arrangements will make councils less political party-driven, but traditional loyalties will remain strong and they could dampen scrutiny challenges. Similarly, traditional officer unity, combined with concern about progressing their careers could weaken challenges to the executive.

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