Archives for March 17th, 2005

INCLUSIVE LEARNING FOR ALL

Book News, PublicNet: 17 March, 2005

This report from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development highlights the contribution that the effective use of e-learning can make to including people with disabilities in the labour market. It also deals with related issues such as skills shortages, the growing number of people in the UK unable to work and the impact of future legislation on employing people with disabilities.Many of the participants in the research felt the Government needed to do more to drive better accessibility in e-learning, particularly if there is a genuine desire to deliver on commitments to reduce inequality and get more people off long-term sick benefits and back to work. According to the report, the Government should raise awareness of the issue of access for people with disabilities to learning opportunities, and e-learning in particular. It should also provide more support for employers, in terms of advice and financial incentives, to make e-learning content more accessible. People management professionals have a key role to play in raising awareness of this issue.

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HEALTH STAFF GET NEW TOOL TO HELP DEAL WITH CALLERS

Headlines, PublicNet: 17 March, 2005

A system has been developed to help NHS patients get information on medical tests results more quickly and at the same time ease the burden of telephone answering for hospital staff.Leading speech recognition technology specialists Telephonetics have devised the system in conjunction with an NHS Trust and it has been released as a new module on the company’s ACCESS Platform.

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MORE TO HOSPITAL DESIGN THAN CLINICAL BRIEFS SAY EXPERTS

Headlines, PublicNet: 17 March, 2005

The design of new hospitals does not take enough account of the buildings look and feel and how they affect the towns in which they are built, according to a report today. The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment says poor design and location of hospitals could condemn future generations of people to using facilities that do not reach their potential.The warning comes in “Design Reviewed 2”, CABE’s annual report, which looks at the most noteworthy projects examined by its Design Review Panel. The panel finds that the majority of hospitals that members looked at were not adequately informed by a study of the cities in which they were being built.

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