Archives for October 6th, 2005

MULTI-AGENCY AUDIT – CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE, AND MATERNITY SERVICES

Abstracts, PublicNet: 6 October, 2005

This audit used by Sefton Council in Merseyside measured performance against the 11 standards of the National Service Framework for Children, Young People and Maternity Services. It provided a robust framework of actions across organizations. The audit tool, produced by joint-funded local authority and Primary Care Trust staff, was sent out to all the major providers of children’s services, and was then subsequently analysed. It gave clear indicators of gaps across services either statutory or nonstatutory. The audit tool has also been widely circulated throughout the local strategic health authority, as well as being used by other organisations including Acute Trusts.The audit results are being used strategically to evidence good practice, reveal gaps and inform the Single Children and Young Person’s Plan of priorities, within the local health economy. Information in the audit had the added bonus of identifying pockets of good practice as well as perceived gaps. The timescale for the audit and implementation plan was less than one year.

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LOCAL POLLUTION CONTROL CHARGES MAY BE BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Headlines, PublicNet: 6 October, 2005

Defra is asking for feedback on plans to increase the fees that local authorities charge for carrying out pollution control checks. Ministers also want views on the suggestion that charges are based on a business’s environmental impact.The proposed changes to fees and charges relate to two key pollution control regimes, local air pollution and control and local authority integrated pollution prevention and control. The fees would rise by 2.5 per cent next year. Local authorities regulate a number of industrial processes, carrying out inspections, issuing permits and imposing conditions. Up to date they have issued around 17,000 permits.

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STUDY SHOWS PUPILS WHO EAT SCHOOL DINNERS ARE NOT LESS HEALTHY

Headlines, PublicNet: 6 October, 2005

The health of children who eat school dinners is no worse – and in some respects may even be better – than that of pupils who eat meals prepared at home, according to a study published today online by the British Medical Journal. The study comes only three days after the “Turning The Tables” report, which set out recommendations for changes to school menus to establish new minimum standards to ensure pupils get essential nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Those proposals are now the subject of a 13-week consultation.The researchers behind today’s study say that the nutritional content of school dinners has caused great concern but there is little information available comparing the health of school pupils who do and do not eat them. They have though welcomed moves to improve school meals.

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