Archives for February 9th, 2006

ETHNIC INEQUALITIES AND PUBLIC SECTOR GOVERNANCE

Book News, PublicNet: 9 February, 2006

By Yusuf BanguraThe contributors discuss the links between ethnicity, inequality and governance. Their findings suggest that it is not the existence of diversity per se, but types of diversity that explain potentials for conflict or cohesion in multi-ethnic societies. Relative equality has been achieved in the public sectors of countries that are highly fragmented or those with ethnicity-sensitive policies, but not in those with ethnicity-blind policies. The book is critical of approaches to conflict management that underplay background conditions in shaping choices.

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STUDY SHOWS NEIGHBOURHOODS’ INFLUENCE ON CHILDREN IS WEAKENING

Headlines, PublicNet: 9 February, 2006

The neighbourhood in which a child is brought up has far less impact on educational and employment outcomes in later life than the young person’s family background and, according to research published today, the effect of the area where a child lives is getting weaker.The research is published in the Royal Economic Society’s “Economic Journal” and is based on Norwegian data by Oddbjorn Raaum, Kjell Salvanes and Erik Sorensen, who suggest that the decline in the impact of the neighbourhood is driven by policies designed to increase equality of opportunity, particularly education reforms.

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DOSSIER TURNS SPOTLIGHT ON THE ‘HIDDEN HEROES’ OF THE NHS

Headlines, PublicNet: 9 February, 2006

New research highlights the contribution to the National Health Service of a hidden group of hospital doctors. The doctors, who the British Medical association says most people have never heard of, are responsible for more than one in ten operations carried out in Britain each year.The BMA is publishing a dossier today detailing the contribution to patient care of Staff Grade and Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors who, it claims, do not get the recognition they deserve. The research shows that in 2002 an SAS doctor was the senior surgeon present at more than 7,500 weekday daytime operations, or 12 per cent of the total carried out in the UK. It says the latest figures show that, excluding trainees, SAS doctors make up 49 per cent of the Accident and Emergency doctors in England and 23 per cent of the country’s surgeons.

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