Abstracts: March 3rd, 1999

Pinto R F
Public Administration and Development, (UK), Oct 1998 Vol 18 No 4
Start page: 387. No of pages: 11.

Argues that the global trend towards market dominance and a reduction in state intervention has led to demands for state reform in developed and developing countries. Assesses the consequent difficulties for public management practitioners in operationalizing the opposing demands for service growth and improvement and fiscal restraint. Highlights the experiences of the UK and certain countries in Central and Eastern Europe to investigate the efficacy of market-based innovations in the public sector. Outlines the basic functions of public services, namely provision, production and delivery and discusses the arguments for state control of provision together with a state exit from production and delivery. Contends that the nature of the good or service being provided determines the appropriateness of market-type innovations. Explores the debate between those who believe the state should be strong and interventionist, albeit restrained, and those who advocate a minimalist state where market-based enterprises dominate. Concludes that improvements in public services arise from a sequential approach to developing effective strategies rather than the ideological orientation, whether strong or minimalist, of the country involved.

Subject(s): SERVICES, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, INNOVATION, PUBLIC SECTOR, MARKET ORIENTATION, UK, EASTERN EUROPE, ECONOMY
Database: TMA: Top Management Abstracts AFA: Accounting & Finance Abstracts RMI: Rapid Management Intelligence
Style: Theoretical with application in practice
Reference: 28AA716

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