Abstracts: March 24th, 2000

Dixon N M
The Learning Organization, (UK), 1999 Vol 6 No 5
Start page: 212. No of pages: 5

Sees the main contribution arising from the concept of the learning organization as being the recognition that all employees within the organization can contribute useful knowledge, not just a select group of experts. Models the old processes by which knowledge was developed and shared by experts, comparing it with the new model in which knowledge is distributed across the organization. Illustrates the new model by describing the ‘Best Practice Replication’ system, used in Ford’s Vehicle Operations plants, to transfer knowledge between the plants; British Petroleum’s ‘Peer Assist’ system designed to encourage colleagues to assist teams in solving difficult problems; and Lockheed Martin’s LM21 Best Practice set up to facilitate the transfer of best practice across the organization. Based on this analysis, identifies the activities needed for knowledge transfer – each team is a giver and receiver; reciprocity is built into the exchange; existing knowledge is transferred; and new knowledge is developed during this transfer process.

Subject(s): ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING, KNOWLEDGE WORKERS, INFORMATION EXCHANGE, FORD, MOTOR INDUSTRY, BRITISH PETROLEUM, OIL INDUSTRY, LOCKHEED MARTIN, AEROSPACE INDUSTRY
Database: TMA: Top Management Abstracts HRMA: Human Resource Management Abstracts RMI: Rapid Management Intelligence
Style: Theoretical with application in practice, Case study
ISSN: 0969-6474. Reference: 28BB037

Reproduced by permission of Anbar Management Intelligence
http://www.anbar.co.uk/management/home.htm