Abstracts: June 8th, 2000

Edwards C, Robinson OHuman Resource Management Journal, (UK), 1999 Vol 9 No 4

Start page: 5. No of pages: 14

Looks at whether employers or employees gain most advantage from part-time working, pointing out that the move to part-time status is most often initiated by the employee – and not the employer. Investigates the issues by looking at the employment of part-time workers in the Metropolitan Police force in the UK, choosing this employer because it falls within the category of skilled, non-manual work in which part-time work is expanding most rapidly. Analyses the operation of the Metropolitan police force’s part-time working scheme, assessing its impact on the flexibility of the workforce and on equal opportunities. Finds that the primary motive for its introduction was not to minimize labour costs but a reactive policy brought in because of demand in the workforce. Concludes that this lack of planning causes problems for both managers and employees: managers finding the effective deployment of part-time workers difficult; part-time employees finding themselves marginalized with reduced opportunities for training, development and promotion. Underlines that this approach undermines the business case for part-time working.

Subject(s): PART-TIME WORK, MANPOWER PLANNING, LABOUR COSTS, EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES, IMPLEMENTATION, POLICE, UNITED KINGDOM

Style: Theoretical with application in practice, Case study

ISSN: 0954-5395. Reference: 29AA326

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