Abstracts: June 26th, 2000

Mallon M, Duberley JHuman Resource Management Journal, (UK), 2000 Vol 10 No 1

Start page: 33. No of pages: 15

Reports statistics that indicate that a growing number of people in the UK are employed on a flexible, contingent basis. Considers the implications for human resource management practices relating to this group within the workforce, using the biographies and interviews with 25 people (17 women and 8 men) who had worked as managers within the National Health Service, who had left and developed a portfolio of working arrangements, including consultancy, freelance arrangements, temporary employment contracts and part-time work. Identifies three issues surrounding these new careers – how the people approached contracting with an organization; their relationship with the contracting organization; and their access to training and development. Notes that the contingent workers relied heavily on the contacts made in their old organizations for new work; that they valued the possibility of developing long-term relationships with an organization and were concerned about the transactional nature of the relationship; and that the issue of training is problematic. Discusses the implications of this for human resource management practices, arguing that human resource managers will have to develop systems which do not treat contingent workers as outsiders if they are to reap the full benefits of the contingent workforce.

Subject(s): FLEXIBLE WORKING, HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, EMPLOYEE RELATIONS, TRAINING, UNITED KINGDOM, MANAGERS, PROFESSIONALS

Style: Survey, Theoretical with application in practice

ISSN: 0954-5395. Reference: 29AG563

Reproduced by permission of Anbar Management Intelligence http://www.anbar.co.uk/management/home.htm