Abstracts: August 15th, 2000

Wenger E C, Snyder W MHarvard Business Review, (USA), Jan-Feb 2000 Vol 78 No 1

Start page: 139. No of pages: 7

Introduces the idea of communities of practice and identifies their main characteristics. Compares their purpose and composition with formal workgroups, project teams and informal networks, noting their informal, self-selecting and ongoing nature. Suggests that paradoxically, to reach their full potential, these communities need organizational recognition and support. Uses examples to identify ways in which communities of practice add value to organizations, by driving strategy, starting new lines of business, rapid problem solving, transferring best practices, developing professional skills and helping organizations to recruit and retain talent. Regards the community of practice as a source of knowledge development and therefore central to meeting the challenge of the knowledge economy.

Subject(s): INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS, ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS, INFORMATION EXCHANGE, GROUP WORKING, PROJECT TEAM, NETWORKING

Database: TMA: Top Management Abstracts HRMA: Human Resource Management Abstracts OC: Organizational Change EB: European Business PS: Public Sector Management OPMA: Operations & Production Management Abstracts

Style: Wholly theoretical

ISSN: 0017-8012. Reference: 29AJ056

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