Abstracts: October 12th, 2000

Cao G, Clarke S, Lehaney BThe TQM Magazine, (UK), 2000 Vol 12 No 3

Start page: 186. No of pages: 8

Notes the attention TQM received in the 1990s as a means to aid competitiveness through bringing about change despite a high implementation failure rate. Declares TQM focuses primarily on process, but change has to be seen in a wider context – a systemic view covering all change aspects. Draws from the literature to expand on what constitutes organizational change, distilling out four inter-related types – process-related, structure-related (functions etc.), values-related (human behaviour), and power-related (organizational politics). Examines TQM philosophies against this taxonomy. Finds considerable process-related commentary but little regarding the tackling of the other areas. Concludes, therefore, that TQM is primarily process-focused, which might explain its failures as wider organizational implications often result from TQM implementation. Declares that for TQM to be successful, either (i) it needs to be restricted to areas where process dominates, or (ii) a systemic approach has to be taken. Recommends the latter as best, supported by multiple methods and outcomes from related TQM research/empirical studies.

Subject(s): TQM, SYSTEMIC THINKING, ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE, IMPLEMENTATION, PROJECT MANAGEMENT, CORPORATE CULTURE, CHANGE MANAGEMENT

Style: Wholly theoretical. ISSN: 0954-478X. Reference: 29AL888

Reproduced by permission of Anbar Management Intelligence http://www.anbar.co.uk/management/home.htm