TELECARE: TOMORROW’S WORLD

Features: May 2nd, 2008

By Steve Sadler

Half a century of telecare has brought unimaginable developments in the support of people in their own homes and successfully improved the lives of millions. Older people and those with long term needs are able to continue to live at home well beyond past expectations. The author describes how smarter sensors and new ways of processing information mean that care teams are able to respond more proactively and effectively. He looks at the economic benefits to the NHS and local councils and glimpses the future for the next half century.

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HOUSING NEW IMMIGRANTS

Features: April 25th, 2008

By David Robinson, Kesia Reeve and Rionach Casey,

There is an increasingly divisive debate and media speculation about the motives of new immigrants and the priorities of statutory agencies and housing service providers. Many assumptions are made about the consequences for long-standing residents. Questions are raised about who gets what and why, and the knock-on effects for local neighbourhoods.
This article explores the arrival experiences and settlement stories of new immigrants. It focuses on their housing experiences and considers the consequences of their arrival for local housing markets and neighbourhoods.

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USING EVIDENCE – WHERE HAVE WE GOT TO AND HOW DO WE GO FORWARD?

Features: April 18th, 2008

By Sandra Nutley

The clamour for evidenced based policy can be heard world wide. In the UK policies emerging from departments must have an evidence base. The author describes how a better understanding about social programme implementation, client experiences of those programmes, and the sources and causes of implementation failure are having an impact.

She counters the argument that better research use is unproblematic, rational and linear and that the relationships between research, evidence, policy and practice are straightforward. She describes the agenda for action and calls for a wide-ranging debate and dialogue.

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REWARDING YOUNG PEOPLE FOR PRO-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Features: April 11th, 2008

By Julia Hirst, Eleanor Formby, Sadie Parr, Judy Nixon, Caroline Hunter and John Flint.

Young people are often unfairly demonised in current debates about anti-social behaviour. This article describes how reward schemes work and it looks at the effect of rewarding young people for pro-social behaviour and the positive contributions they can make to their communities. The authors also looked at the features that contribute to the success of reward schemes.

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TACKLING TABOOS: BEATING BULLYING

Features: April 4th, 2008

By Martyn Goodhand

Bullying in schools has long been the elephant in the corner, an issue which all schools and local authorities are aware of, but which for some was a strict taboo, a subject that was not discussed in open forum, for fear of being branded as having “a bullying problem”. The author describes how real-time reporting and monitoring, coupled with greater collaboration and data sharing can help eliminate bullying and enable schools and local authorities to meet the Government’s goal of a world-class education for every child.

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WARD COUNCILLORS AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP: A FUTURE PERSPECTIVE

Features: March 28th, 2008

By Saffron James and Ed Cox,

The role ward councillors should play in community leadership and strategic decision making has become a pressing issue for local authorities in the context of current policy and legislative changes. This article investigates how the role is likely to change as neighbourhood working, legislative and policy changes impact on the role of local government. It identifies obstacles to developing new roles and the need for a culture change. It argues for the introduction of a ward councillor compact.
The future role of elected members has become a pressing issue in the context of current legislative and policy changes affecting local government.

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ATTACHMENT TO PLACE, SOCIAL NETWORKS, MOBILITY AND PROSPECTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

Features: March 14th, 2008

By Anne E Green and Richard J White.

This article explores how young people’s attitudes towards education, training and work opportunities are shaped by their social networks and attachment to place, and looks at how interventions might widen their horizons and improve their prospects. There are ongoing policy concerns about deprivation of individuals, poverty relating to place and how to transform the prospects of deprived places.
Concentrations of worklessness persist despite a favourable economic climate and policies aimed at helping people to find work. This has provoked an upsurge of interest in the role of geography in the labour market behaviour of people living in deprived areas.

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BACK TO BASICS WHEN COMMISSIONING PUBLIC SERVICES

Features: March 7th, 2008

By Andrew Hind

This article was first published in Public Management and Policy and is reproduced by permission of the Association. http://www.cipfa.org.uk/pmpa/index.cfm

Government has ambitious plans to increase the involvement of charities in delivering public services. The Charity Watchdog discovered from a survey that bureaucracy and cost cutting is hurting charities. Managing large numbers of short term public service delivery contracts has become an administrative burden eating into charity funds. Recovering the costs of service delivery is proving difficult. Charities need to improve pricing and costing skills, but commissioning authorities need to recognise that adding value does not mean free extras.

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ALWAYS ARGUE WITH SUCCESS IF YOU WANT TO IMPROVE

Features: February 29th, 2008

By David M. Allen,

Success and failure are closely inter-related, but to achieve continuous improvement there must be a focus on failing. There is a need to argue with success and not to believe that things are working as well as they could. It’s important to seek out evidence of failure, obsessively. Listen to customers. The danger is being blinded by success, rather than thinking carefully about the measures employed and ensuring that some of them might better be characterised as ‘failure measures’. From this approach it is possible to learn that not everything is working as well as it could be. There are always ways to get better. Today’s success is just a level of failure as yet unrealized.

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THE ROLE OF POLITICAL PARTIES IN POLITICAL LEADERSHIP

Features: February 22nd, 2008

By Christina Dykes

This article was first published in Public Management and Policy and is reproduced by permission of the Association. http://www.cipfa.org.uk/pmpa/index.cfm

Without political conviction our local representatives would at best be mere managers and we would lose some of the checks and balances that a democratic system brings. But all is not well with local representation. The recruitment and selection of councillors leaves much to be desired. The result is an unbalanced mix of local representatives, mostly white males. The situation is compounded by inadequate training. These are challenges for political parties and the new Councillors Commission.

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