TACKLING ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS IN DEPRIVED AREAS

Features: February 17th, 2005

By Karen Lucas, Sara Fuller, Anthony Psaila and Diana Thrush Despite efforts to renew Britain’s poorest neighbourhoods, the dirty and neglected appearance of many deprived areas continues to plague local residents. There is an array of legal powers and in many cases funding, but the ‘clean up’ process is slow or stationary. The authors argue that local strategic partnerships are well placed to overcome this patchwork quilt of responsibilities and deliver cleaner neighbourhoods.



COUNTERING IDENTITY THEFT AND FRAUD

Features: February 11th, 2005

As more public services go on line the scope for exploiting identity theft and fraud increases. At the same time developments in technology are providing increasing safeguards to counter the work of fraudsters. The wealth of information held on a variety of databases is available to those with a legitimate need to authenticate identity and verify an address. This feature explains what can be done to counter fraud and how the technology can support investigations.

COMMUNITIES THAT CARE

Features: February 4th, 2005

By Iain Crow, Alan France, Sue Hacking, and Mary Hart Community-based early intervention and prevention programmes aim to tackle future social problems. Their development has become an important part of government’s approach to community capacity building. This evaluation programme shows how one such approach can be implemented in deprived communities, what impacts it is having after five years of implementation and how these can be measured.

BETTER ACCESS TO E-GOVERNMENT

Features: January 28th, 2005

Better Access To e-Government

By Lucy Brown

With the current flurry of activity, as councils work towards the 2005 deadline, it’s easy to think that e-Government is a new phenomenon. In fact, the drive to modernise public services and improve citizen access is far from recent. The big question is, given all the enthusiasm, activity, and money spend, has there been real progress?

Read more on BETTER ACCESS TO E-GOVERNMENT…

REINVENTING LEADERSHIP

Features: January 21st, 2005

By Keith Ruddle The pressure to rethink how we ‘do leadership’ across the diverse and complex public sector with its 25,000 organisations and 5 million people is as strong as it ever was. What is changing and bringing leadership into sharper relief is the increasing pace of change. This means that there is a need to rethink our model of leadership in organisations to address the key challenges in reinventing public service leadership in the next few years.

EVALUATING SUPPORT FOR YOUNG FAMILIES UNDER STRESS

Features: January 14th, 2005

By Colette McAuley, Martin Knapp, Jennifer Beecham, Nyree McCurry and Michelle Sleed, Supporting parents is central to the government’s approach to improving children’s lives. However, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of family support services. The authors evaluated Home-Start, one of the largest family support organisations in the UK, established over thirty years ago. They describe the outcome of volunteer home visiting support to families with children under five and compare the findings with families who did not receive support.

ESTABLISHING THE NEW LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

Features: January 7th, 2005

By Ewart Wooldridge The higher education sector, which is made up of all UK universities and colleges of further education, is faced with a major agenda for change. The agenda is fuelled by a combination of rapid growth, capital programmes, funding challenges and the potential for new partnerships or alliances. The author sets out the early priorities of the recently established Leadership Foundation and outlines the flagship projects that will move the agenda forward.

TACKLING RE-GENERATION IN A SOCIAL ENTERPRISE ZONE

Features: December 17th, 2004

By Matthew Smerdon and David Robinson The UK’s first Social Enterprise Zone (SEZ), based in Newham, east London, was established in 1998. The SEZ is a test bed for new policies and services tackling regeneration in deprived areas. Users of public services and front-line workers generate all the ideas. The authors, who were involved in running the SEZ report on the lessons from its first years.

RECOVERING FROM DISASTER IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR

Features: December 10th, 2004

Dr. Johannes C. Scholtes Disasters resulting from weather, fire, theft, burglary, computer hacking, and acts of terrorism occur without warning. Surveys reveal limited planning for disaster recovery, particularly from the loss of paper records. The author describes the likely effects of a disaster and looks at the problems of recovery and of maintaining business continuity.

EFFECTIVE GOVERNANCE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Features: December 3rd, 2004

By Paul Williams and Alan Thomas Because sustainable development is a ‘wicked issue’ spanning across boundaries, its governance presents a major challenge. The authors looked at how the challenge is being met in Wales and found problems ranging from a lack of political and executive leadership to confusing and multiple pathways between the Welsh Assembly and local government. They argue that the components for good governance are in place and they set out a framework for integrating effort which also has relevance to the English regions.

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