TAKING CONTROL

Features: July 4th, 2003

By Derek McAuley Reproduced by permission of the Public Management and Policy Association. Although health inequalities have widened in the last five decades, tackling them is now central to the policy agenda of the New Labour Government. The author describes a need for innovative and exciting community-based solutions, but recognizes that a cultural change and new ways of working are required to move away from saving lives to promoting health. He argues that it is only by engaging with local communities that the NHS and local government will shift public perceptions away from health to health services.



OLDER PEOPLE’S VIEWS ON INFORMATION, ADVICE AND ADVOCACY

Features: July 1st, 2003

By Ann Quinn, Angela Snowling and Pam Denicolo Getting information about services provided by the statutory and voluntary services can be a daunting task. If you are older and English is not your first language the information barrier is much more difficult to penetrate. The authors found that the information, like the services themselves, was agency based and finding out what you needed to know was a matter of chance. They offer suggestions for a joined up information strategy with a user focus.

THE MODERNIZATION AGENDA: PUBLIC SERVICES IN A DARK AGE

Features: June 27th, 2003

By John Seddon Reproduced by permission of the Public Management and Policy Association. Command and control management separates decision-making from work and results in sub-optimization and lower morale. Targets are the main levers in this dark age of management. The author argues that it is this approach to management that is limiting progress in public services. He advocates a flow of production approach, typified by Japanese car makers, which integrates decision making with work and where those who do the work develop and use measures and controls.

THE ROLE OF FLEXIBLE EMPLOYMENT FOR OLDER WORKERS

Features: June 24th, 2003

By Stephen Lissenburgh and Deborah Smeaton An increasing number of people are leaving work before state pension age and a number of initiatives have been launched to tap into this valuable economic potential as the younger labour force shrinks. The authors look at the way that flexible jobs bridge the gap between full employment and retirement. They suggest options to promote flexible working.

LEADERSHIP: TIME TO DEBUNK MYTHS AND FACE REAL CHALLENGES

Features: June 20th, 2003

By Beverly Alimo-Metcalfe, John Alban-Metcalfe and Ian Briggs. Reproduced by permission of the Public Management and Policy Association. Leadership styles in the public sector are influenced by demands to meet targets. The authors argue that this can result in inappropriate styles and conflict between values. From extensive research across local government and the NHS they outline a leadership model which embraces target setting but includes other dimensions which lead to transformational leadership.

A VISION FOR SMARTCARDS

Features: June 17th, 2003

By Martin Reilly Smart cards with chips the size of a spec of dust will play an important role in the process of joining up public services and securing access. A consortium of councils are piloting their use with adults, young people and children. The author looks to the way smart card technology may impact on public services.

ENGAGING FAITH COMMUNITIES IN URBAN REGENERATION

Features: June 13th, 2003

By Richard Farnell, Robert Furbey, Stephen Shams al Haqq Hills, Marie Macey and Greg Smith Although there is a growing interest in bringing faith communities into regeneration initiatives, regeneration professionals and faith leaders show a widespread lack of awareness and understanding of the detail of government policy and advice. The authors explored the community involvement issues related to faith communities. They set out ways in which social participation can be encouraged to bring benefits to the wider community.

A NEW APPROACH TO PARTNERING WITH GOVERNMENT

Features: June 10th, 2003

By David Locke Outsourcing is becoming an increasingly important across the public sector in the drive for better services. The author explains how third party help can improve partnerships and gives a snapshot of how it worked in practice with Lancashire County Council.

MOTIVATING PUBLIC WORKERS: LESSONS FROM NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

Features: June 6th, 2003

By Arthur C. Brooks. Reproduced by permission of the Public Management and Policy Association. Nonprofit organizations have found many ways of motivating employees without pay incentives. The author argues that their experience translates directly across to public service workers where frequently a pay incentive is not an option. He describes approaches used to aid in employee motivation and in recruitment and retention.

DIVERSITY IS NORMAL – IGNORING IT ISN’T

Features: June 3rd, 2003

By Loraine Martins and Helen Goulding. Reproduced by permission of the Public Management and Policy Association. The public sector is moving from solving diversity problems to celebrating and valuing differences. It is now recognized that people who are discriminated against – women, disabled people, older people, lesbians and gay men, and people from ethnic minority communities – actually form the majority of the community. The authors describe how diversity is being promoted and the benefits to service users and employees.

© PublicNet is a KnowShare production | Technology by Jag Singh + Hilton & Hilton Ltd | Admin Log in