Headlines: April 27th, 2007

MORE STAFF IN FRONTLINE EDUCATION AND HEALTH

 

The teaching and medical workforces continued to grow in the past year, but the budget over-runs in some NHS trusts resulted in an overall staff cut.

The teaching workforce increased by 17,300 over the past 12 months. The increase is mainly accounted for by 6% rise in the number of support staff to 305,500. There has also been a drop in the number of teacher vacancies in nursery, primary, secondary and special schools to 2,040 which is 0.6% of teachers in post. The data also shows that the pupil-teacher ratio has fallen within both primary and secondary schools. The number of teacher vacancies in nursery, primary, secondary and special schools has dropped 9% since 2006 and vacancy rates remain stable. Head teacher vacancies have also fallen from 0.8% to 0.6%.

The NHS presents a more complex picture. There was an overall reduction of 17,000 in the past year and some 2000 of these were nurses. However, the number of doctors increased by over 3000. There was also a fall of 2500 in the number of managers. This represents 6.5% of all managers. This is the first fall since 1995. Managers now account for less than 3% of the total workforce. This compares with nurses who make up more than a quarter. The NHS employs 1,095,164 staff.